Dwarf Gourami Detailed Care Guide, Diseases, Cure & All | 2022

By: Martin McAdam
Updated: March 20, 2022

Dwarf Gouramis are one of the most popular freshwater tropical fish in the aquarium trade. Dr. Herbert R. Axelrod first introduced them in 1968, and they were called Microctenopoma (Pansophos), Firefish Dwarf Gourami, Trichogaster lalius, and Macropodus opercularis.

This species is also called Fire Gourami, Spotted Dwarf Gourami, and Banded Lined Gourami. It has a black horizontal band near the dorsal fin and an orange body with three dark bands, which makes this fish one of the most attractive varieties among aquarium fishes.

The length of this fish is around two inches, and it can be kept in a community tank with other small fish. Dwarf Gouramis are often confused with betta fish, but they are not related. They can also be mistaken for female betta fish when they are in breeding colors, so it is important to study their fins carefully.

You can compare their fins to see whether or not they are breeding. Females have short fins that do not cover the body of the fish, while males have long flowing dorsal, anal, and pelvic fins.

They were first bred in large numbers in Florida, USA.

Different Types Of Dwarf Gourami

There are many varieties of Dwarf Gouramis. They were created by breeders who crossed different species of gouramis. The most common ones include King Ruby, King Tiger, Electric Blue, Powder Blue, and Marble Pearl.

Dwarf Gourami

This is beautiful marble gourami with brilliant blue color all over its body which is one of the most popular varieties. Its body is often marbled with gold, white and black which makes this fish look like a pearl necklace.

The King Tiger Dwarf Gourami has an orange and white pattern all over its body. The dorsal fin of this fish has a dark blue stripe, and it also has a broad horizontal band at the base of the dorsal fin.

The Electric Blue Dwarf Gourami has a bright electric blue color all over its body. This fish is also popular for its long-flowing fins. They have a dark blue stripe running from the head through its entire length.

The Powder Blue Dwarf Gourami has a white, blue, and black color all over its body. The base of the dorsal fin has a thin light-blue line that runs from the middle of the fish's body to its tail.

The Marble Pearl Dwarf Gourami has an orange marbled pattern all over its body which makes it look like marble.

The King Ruby Dwarf Gourami is similar to the King Tiger Dwarf Gourami, but it has a bright red-orange color and darker markings on its body.

Varieties of fire gouramis have short fins, while marble gouramis have long ones.

Facts And Characteristics Of Dwarf Gourami

Given below are a few facts and characteristics of Dwarf Gouramis.

How Do Dwarf Gourami Look Like?

Dwarf Gouramis are small fish that typically grow to about 2 inches in length. They have a torpedo-shaped body, and their coloring can be pretty varied, but they are usually light blue or pink with some black markings. They have a long, pointed dorsal fin and a forked tail.

Dwarf Gourami

They look similar to the three-spot Gourami but can be distinguished by the black band that runs horizontally near the dorsal fin. Their body is also rounder and more compact than that of the three-spot Gourami.

They have barbels around their mouths which they use to find food in the water and also to move around when they swim.

They use their protrusible mouths to suck up food from the substrate of the tank. Their fins look delicate, but they are quite hardy and can adapt to a wide range of water conditions.

Average Lifespan And Growth Of Dwarf Gourami

The average lifespan for a Dwarf Gourami is around 2-3 years, but they can live for up to 5 years with proper care. The female lives are longer than the male. A Dwarf Gourami can live up to 3 years in an aquarium, but they have been known to live for 5 years.

Dwarf Gourami

In the wild, Dwarf Gouramis have been known to live for about 5 years. They can live for up to 7 years in captivity, but they usually only survive for 3-4 years because of the poor environment that they are forced to live in.

These fishes are called Dwarf fishes because they are smaller in size compared to other Gouramis. Their size is around 2 inches.

They get their name from their small size. When born, they measure around 0.5 inches, but they usually grow to 2 inches as adults. They weigh around 0.1 oz at birth and 0.5 oz as adults.

Habitat Of Dwarf Gourami

Dwarf Gouramis are found in Southeast Asia, and they can be found in a variety of different ecosystems. Dwarf Gouramis are a popular South Asian aquarium fish that can be kept in a variety of different tanks.

Dwarf Gourami

In the wild, they can be found in the slow-moving rivers, flooded forests, and wetlands of Asia. They are a fully-aquatic species that will swim freely throughout their acrylic fish tank and do not need a lot of low light plants or decorations to feel safe.

They prefer to have densely planted areas where they can graze on plants for algae and hide places from larger fish. They should be kept in a tank with an open area for swimming and dense plants, as well as some hiding places like driftwood or rocks where they can feel safe.

They typically hide among plants or roots, and they leave the safety of their burrows only when feeding or when spawning.

They do best when they are kept in groups of three or more fish. They will playfully interact with their tank-mates and keep each other company all day long. They will be happier and healthier in larger tanks, but they can survive in smaller ones as well.

They survive healthily in the wild by being able to hide among plants and roots. They should be kept in a tank with plenty of live plants and roots to hide in. The tank should also be well-decorated with rocks, caves, and other hiding places to make the fish feel safe.

Temperament Of Dwarf Gourami

Dwarf Gouramis are usually considered to be one of the more peaceful fish species, and they can usually be kept in community tanks with other small fish.

Dwarf Gourami

However, they may become territorial if there is not enough space or if the tank is not well-enough decorated. They can be kept with a wide range of community fish, but they may become aggressive and territorial if there is not enough space or if it feels unsafe.

They are peaceful freshwater tropical aquarium fish that can be kept in community tanks along with other small, docile species. They will eat smaller fish, so they should only be kept with fish that will not fit in their mouth.

They can get aggressive when feeling threatened and may attack other fish. They should not be kept with larger or more dominant fish, but they may get along with slow-moving tankmates of a similar size.

Breeding Of Dwarf Gourami

Dwarf Gouramis may breed with three spot gourami or large Gourami in the wild. Their breeding is similar to these fishes. Males build bubble nests at the surface of the water, and they will care for the eggs by creating a current through their fins to bring food to them.

Dwarf Gourami

Breeding males can be distinguished by their swollen lips and more vibrant colors. Their breeding process involves the male building a bubble nest and then caring for the eggs until they hatch. The males become very aggressive when breeding, so keeping them in their tank is best.

Females can be stressed by too much male attention, so it is best to keep them in a tank of their own with some plants for them to hide behind.

Dwarf Gourami can be bred in captivity by following some simple steps. The male will build a bubble nest at the surface of the tank, and the female will lay her eggs inside.

The male will then fertilize the eggs and take responsibility for guarding and caring for them until they hatch.

The eggs will hatch in around 24 hours, and the fry can be fed newly hatched brine shrimp or commercially prepared fry food until they can eat larger foods.

The eggs are small, and they are attached to the underside of broad leaves or on the stems of plants. The male will guard the eggs until they hatch, and he will also guard the young fish until they can fend for themselves. The female is usually removed before the eggs hatch because she may eat them.

Social Structure

Dwarf Gourami is schooling fish, and they do best when kept in groups of three or more. They will playfully interact with their tank-mates and keep each other company all day long.

They live in groups of up to 200 fish in the wild, and they rely on their interactions with others for protection. They are timid fish that will usually only come out from their hiding places when they are feeding.

The male Dwarf Gouramis will establish a hierarchy in the tank, and they may become aggressive towards other Dwarf Gourami that invades their space. They should be kept with other types of fish that are not prone to be bullied or harmed, such as freshwater catfish or Plecos.

Dwarf Gourami Care Guide

Dwarf Gourami makes popular aquarium fish, and they are easy to care for. They are hardy fish that can survive in a variety of different tanks.

Tank Requirements

The tank size should be at least 20 gallons, and it should be densely planted with lots of live plants. The tank should also have plenty of rocks, pebbles, caves, tunnels, and other decors that can provide hiding places for the fish.

Dwarf Gourami

They should be kept in a tank with an open area for swimming and dense plants and some hiding places like driftwood or rocks where they can feel safe. They typically hide among plants or roots, and they only come out when feeding or spawning.

They should be kept in a tank with plenty of live plants and roots to hide in. The tank should have a lid as they are jumpy fish, and they will jump out of the tank if given a chance.

Dwarf Gourami does best when kept in a tank that has a good filtration system. You should use a filter that can handle large waste, such as an activated carbon filter or a canister filter.

You should also use a filter that will circulate the water. A powerhead or a small internal filter is necessary to keep the Gourami healthy and happy.

Dwarf Gourami needs plenty of oxygen as they come from habitats where there is a lot of plant life and decaying organic matter in the water.

You can provide ample amounts of oxygen to the tank by using an air pump and airstone or a filter that provides ample amounts of oxygen. You can do this by using an air pump and airstone or a filter that provides ample amounts of oxygen.

Dwarf Gourami does well in both low and high lighting conditions. You should use a light that will provide enough light for the plants in the tank, but you do not need to use a high-intensity light.

Water Parameters

Dwarf Gourami can tolerate a range of water parameters, but they prefer a pH of 6.5 to 7.5 and a water temperature of 72-79 degrees Fahrenheit. The water hardness should be between 5 and 19 GH, and the KH should be less than 8.

Dwarf Gourami

The watering acidity should be between 6.0 and 8.0 for optimum health, though they can survive in a range of 5-8 pH without any problems. Healthy water parameters will help Dwarf Gourami to be healthy and happy.

Feeding

Dwarf Gouramis are omnivorous and will eat a wide range of foods. They will eat both plant and animal material, and they can be fed a variety of different foods to ensure that they get the nutrients that they need.

Dwarf Gourami

They eat insects, insect larvae, algae, and other plant matter in the wild. They can be fed a variety of live and frozen foods as well as flakes or pelleted food. In addition to that, they should be given fresh vegetables such as blanched cucumber as it has been shown to enhance the colors of this fish.

They should be fed a diet that is high in protein and low in fat. They can be fed brine shrimp, bloodworms, tubifex worms, or flakes to give them the proteins that they need.

They will also eat algae and plants in the tank, but it is best to supplement these with prepared foods. They like to eat live food, but they can also be fed freeze-dried or frozen food like bloodworms, brine shrimp, and daphnia.

Fry can be fed newly hatched brine shrimp or commercially prepared fry food until they can eat larger foods.

Tank Mates Of Dwarf Gourami

Dwarf Gourami can be kept with other fish that are similar in size and temperament. They should not be kept with aggressive fish that will bully them or harm them, such as cichlids.

Dwarf Gourami

The best tank mates for Dwarf Gourami are other types of peaceful fish that do not mind being around other fish of their kind. Some good tank mates for them include other types of Gourami, tetras, barbs, rasboras, and danios.

They should not be kept with smaller, more timid fish that will be unable to compete for food or that may become a snack for the Dwarf Gourami.

Common Possible Diseases

Dwarf Gourami is susceptible to several diseases that are common for freshwater fish. They can develop fin rot, ich, fungus, or bacterial infections if they are not cared for properly.

Dwarf Gourami

Fin Rot is a fungal infection that will cause the fins of the Dwarf Gourami to fall off. This disease is often caused by very warm water, malnutrition, or poor water conditions.

You should immediately do a partial water change and treat with an anti-fungal medication if you notice that your Dwarf Gourami has fin rot.

Ich is a disease that will cause white spots to appear on the fish's fins and body. This is caused by low pH, overfeeding, overcrowding, and poor water quality.

You should do a partial water change with dechlorinated water and treat the tank with an anti-parasite medication if you notice ich in your Dwarf Gourami.

Fungus is caused when the fish eats food that has been contaminated by fungus. The fungus will grow on the fish's body and fins and can cause death. You should do a partial water change and treat it with a fungicide if you notice fungus in your Dwarf Gourami tank.

Bacterial Infections are caused by poor water quality, overfeeding, and stress. The bacteria will cause the fish to develop red sores on their body and fins. You should do a partial water change and treat with an antibiotic if you notice bacterial infections in your Dwarf Gourami tank.

Other common diseases include pop-eye, velvet, and dropsy.

Popeye velvet involves the fish's eyes filling up with fluid and becoming enlarged. The cause of this disease is currently unknown.

You should immediately treat the tank with an antibiotic and reduce the water temperature if you notice pop-eye in your Dwarf Gourami tank.

Dropsy is caused by a bacterial infection that damages the organs of the fish and causes them to swell with fluid. This disease is often caused by a poor diet, injury, or infection.

You should immediately treat the tank with an antibiotic and reduce the water temperature if you notice dropsy in your Dwarf Gourami tank.

If you notice any of these diseases in your Dwarf Gourami, you should immediately do a partial water change and treat it with the appropriate medication.

Conclusion

Dwarf Gourami makes a great addition to any freshwater tank and can be kept with other peaceful fish.

They are susceptible to several diseases, so you should be careful to keep the water quality in your tank high and provide them with a balanced diet. With proper care, Dwarf Gourami can live for several years.

Thank you for reading!

Disclaimer

AquaMarinePower.com does not intend to provide veterinary advice. We go to great lengths to help users better understand their aquatic friends. However, the content on this blog is not a substitute for veterinary guidance. For more information, please read our disclaimer.

Amazon Associates Program

AquaMarinePower.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

Copyright © 2021 AMP
cross